Scientific Program

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Celina Afenir

Nurse Executive Neonatal ICU and Pediatrics, USA

Keynote: Shared Leadership: Creating a Space for Truth to Empower, Engage and Strengthen Relationships

Time : 9:00 AM

Biography:

Celina Afenir is an inspirational and motivational executive with a focus on a truth leadership approach. She has a proven record of success in strategic, organizational, operational, and fiscal management of the Children's Services, specializing in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Pediatrics Unit for major healthcare organizations within the United States Pacific Southwest and Northwest (California, Arizona, Oregon and Washington States). She has a BSN, MBA/Healthcare Management and is currently pursuing a PhD (Doctoral in Performance Improvement Psychology) at Grand Canyon University. She was a co-presenter at the 2016 National Association of Neonatal Nurses 32nd Annual Education Conference on the topic of Innovative Family Centered Care Bundle: One Hospital's Journey of Working with Family and Staff to Significantly Improve Communication and Patient Experience in the NICU.

Abstract:

Background: Based on employee rounding, the NICU leadership team identified the need of the NICU frontline staff members to be encouraged and empowered to make decisions on initiatives, changes, projects and performance improvements.  There is a perception of inconsistent follow through from leadership team on issues, concerns, and suggestions regarding opportunities for improvement.  As a result, historical employee engagement survey participation has been less than 50% and engagement results were below standards. Purpose: The NICU Practice Council was developed to represent the unit-based aspect of the shared governance model in healthcare. The frontline staff members are empowered to identify barriers to clinical practice, improve processes and/or workflow by partnering with the leadership team to help remove identified barriers and facilitate resources. The NICU Practice Council has the responsibility and accountability to establishing and maintaining the standards of evidence-based practice which describe and guide the care provided.  

Biography:

Dr. Amr Hawal is a Pediatrician and Neonatologist whose experience in the field spans 20 years, backed by a higher education degree from Ain Shams University in Egypt, one of the oldest and top ranking universities in the MENA region. He is known for his astute skills in evaluation and strong passion for improving healthcare and wellbeing. He is pioneering an open and contextual evaluation model based on constructive responses, which has led in the creation of new methods to improve pediatric healthcare, neonatology and pediatric nutrition. 
 
Dr. Amr has established this model following his years of experiences in medical practice, research and evaluation, and teaching and administration in hospitals and medical universities in the reigion, including Egypt, Saudi Arabia and the UAE. Dr. Amr has published several studies in reputable international journals in neonatology and pediatric nutrition. He has also presented his findings in prestigious international conferences and symposia.He is presently working as Specialist Pediatrics & Neonatology , HOD Of Pediatric Department , Prime MC, Ajman. Prime Health Care Group LLC, Dubai, UAE.
 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: It’s a clinical case presentation of a male Preterm infant Newborn (+31 wks) who was delivered in our hospital & transferred to our NICU because of Prematurity, VLBW & need to respiratory support. Baby shortly undergo Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC) on 5th day of life shortly after start of expressed milk feeding …! Which was early detected by use of Near Infrared Abdominal spectroscopy (NIRS). Baby was deteriorated clinically in a couple of hours & undergo intestinal perforation with peritonitis , So, Abdominal exploration surgery with intestinal resection & end – to end anastomosis was done urgently.  Baby improved gradually & early feedings was started & gradually increased up to full feedings with use of Human Fortified Milk (HMF) & probiotics , Prebiotics.  
 
Findings: The Study stated the evidence-based Feeding Strategies guidelines for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) among very low birth weight infants & Role of trophic feedings, Probiotics, Prebiotics & 
micronutrients in Prophylaxis, Prevention & Management of NEC.

Keynote Forum

Adel Harb

King Fahad Specialist Hospital- Dammam, KSA

Keynote: Current Challenges facing Nursing Education in Saudi Arabia

Time : 11:00 AM

Biography:

Graduated from Faculty of Nursing, University of Jordan 1993. Had worked as Cardiac Registered Nurse in Jordan. Completed Master Degree in Education from University of Jordan on 1998. Completed another Master Degree in Critical Care from Ohio State University on 1999. Worked at Ministry of National Guards for Health Affairs (NGHA-Riyadh) on 2003 as Clinical Resource Nurse in Nursing Education till 2010. Then worked in NGHA (Madinah) as Supervisor for Safety and Quality till 2014. On 2014-2017 worked as Director of Nursing Education at Security Forces Hospital- Riyadh. On Jan 2018 has joined Nursing Education at King Fahad Specialist Hospital as Nursing Educator Manager Obtained Phd in Healthcare Administration on 2010 and worked as visiting Professor Assistant. Supervising all Saudi Nursing Students - Interns and graduates. Publications : one book "Cardiology for Registered Nurses" , 15 Abstracts and Papers. 3 Researches. Speakers at several international Symposia and conferences, Saudi Heart Association member as senior Regional Faculty for ACLS. Developed many courses and programs accredited by Saudi Council such as “Cardiac Catheterization Upgrading Program, “Invasive Hemodynamic Programs, "Medication Administration Course", "IV Therapy Course", "Preceptor Course", "Charge Nurse Course", "Burn Critical Care Course", "ER Nursing Course", "Pain Management Course", "Wound Care Management Course", "Neonatal Nursing Care', "Critical Care Course" and "Leadership and Management Course" and many Cross Training and Up skilling programs. Currently is developing a Case Management Post Graduate Diploma Program.

Abstract:

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is facing many health related challenges. It was on 1954 when Ministry of Health (MOH) has established Nursing as a profession. Since the last 64 years, nursing has faced many obstacles, difficulties and challenges and there was a direct impact on the growth and development in Nursing Education. Unfortunately, these challenges facing Nursing Education in Saudi Arabia are increasingly complex and dynamic. The main purpose of this paper is to highlight and discuss those challenges through Structure – Process- Outcome model. Moreover, this paper will address some potential strategies that could overcome these challenges and move Nursing Education and Nursing Profession forward and meet the Saudi Arabian vision 2030

 

  • Nursing Education and Management | Nursing Practice | Community Health Nursing
Speaker
Biography:

Jennifer Miller has 19 years of Neonatal ICU experience in both the capacity of a Registered Nurse and Neonatal Nurse Practitioner.  Jennifer has a passion for the overall well-being of NICU families.  Her strong commitment and motivation ignited her into developing and creating a NICU Parent Advisory Council (Phoenix AZ 2013) to support families who are faced with the physiological and psychological challenges inside and outside of the NICU walls.  Her purpose of connecting current and veteran NICU families together has earned an excellence award in the Neonatal Practitioner Innovator category from MEDNAX Health Solutions Partner.  She is also a personal health coach who enjoys being physically active through travelling around the world while consuming the magnificent outdoor activities of her home state of Colorado.  She is

an outstanding advocate who has a vision of making each NICU parent healthier through fitness and adopt an early self-care pattern improving the entire physical and psychological well-being to raise healthier Neonatal ICU baby graduates.

Abstract:

Background

When babies are born and admitted in the NICU for a prolonged period of time, evidence-based research has revealed increased level of anxiety, stress, and post-partum depression affecting NICU parents. These psychological conditions interfere with their ability to bond, breastfeed and care for their child while in the NICU and upon transitioning to home. As they go through their NICU journey, the uncertainty of not knowing whether their baby will live or die can cause their inability to do self-care to meet their own basic needs. They also have high tendencies to feel isolated and alone that can cause major psychological issues common to NICU parents.

Assessment

Exercise releases a natural hormone, serotonin, that regulates one’s psychological status or mood. By improving one’s mood, they have the ability to deal with stressful situations better. Self-confidence and self- efficacy are also positively affected giving parents increased belief in caring for themselves and a medically fragile child.

Recommendation

Program development based on self-care for these families starting in antepartum and immediately after arriving in the NICU. There would be varying different levels of self-care from basic human needs, medication, yoga, meditation, walking or more intense workouts. This program would also come with a virtual NICU community where there would be nothing but positivity to help one another understand they are not alone and the importance of learning to take care of yourself so you can then take care of you NICU grad and your family.

Objectives: The main objective is to decrease the incidence in psychological problems that are related to the NICU. Improved self-care will also improve breast feeding rates, parent bonding and parental emotional states throughout the child’s life span.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Zamzaliza Abdul Mulud is an academician in Centre for Nursing Studies, UiTM Malaysia. Her specialization is in the nursing field specifically in medical surgical, mental health and gerontological nursing. Her research interest includes the effect of the educational program, resilience among caregivers of individuals with illness, quatitative research, and caregiver burden.

 

Abstract:

Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) is among the top four most common causes of maternal death in Malaysia. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a multidisciplinary education program on knowledge, attitude and perceived behavior control of PIH management among antenatal women diagnosed with PIH in rural Malaysia. A quasi-experimental study with pre and post design was conducted to measure the effect of a multidisciplinary education program on study variables guided by the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Sixty-three antenatal mothers with PIH from 6 Maternal and Child Health Clinic in Lahad Datu, Sabah participated in this study and participants were assigned to intervention (n=32) and control group (n=31). Participants in experimental group attended a multidisciplinary education program (8 hours workshop) regarding PIH management and blood pressure control, nutrition, and exercise. Whereas, the control group, did not receive any. Data were collected using a set of questionnaire which measures sociodemographic characteristics of the participants, blood pressure level, knowledge and attitude of PIH management and perceived behavior control. Data were collected from both intervention and control group pre-test and 14 days post-test. A t-test of mean differences was used to examine the effect of the multidisciplinary education program on knowledge, attitude and perceived behavior control of PIH management. Findings showed that there were significant differences in mean score pre and post-test for knowledge (t = 4.97, p < 0.001) and attitude of PIH management (t = 2.76, p < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference in perceived behavioral control between intervention and control group. Findings of this study indicated that the multidisciplinary education program might be utilized as an effective management program for antenatal mother diagnosed with PIH residing in rural areas.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

The Institute of Medicine called for the use of evidenced-based practice approaches to care in 2001 in response to a national initiative to provide a higher standard of healthcare. In 1999 it was estimated that up to 268 people a day in the United States died as a result of medical errors, there was a call to action. The use of scientific knowledge to guide all healthcare practices became the new standard and expectation both by the experts and soon thereafter by the recipients of care. Bringing evidenced-based practice to bedside implementation did not arrive with its own blueprint and the nursing profession has struggled for several years on how to successfully integrate these processes into useable form. Transitioning deeply rooted practices to the newer approaches requires the leader to participate in the journey, shoulder to shoulder, point of care work, demonstrating the possibility and spreading the good news. Healthcare workers are facing many challenges in their daily quest to deliver good care in today’s dynamic healthcare environment, if we are to expect them to conform to new practices we are going to have to pave the way and lay the foundation piece by piece.  A description on a successful bedside report implementation project on a level 111 NICU brings forth success and failures and missteps that became a huge learning curve and emblazoned a passion to continue in this effort. A notable missing component that resulted in the profession being underserved in this area was the identification of individuals with the skills, knowledge, and passion for the work. How is this work going to be completed? There is a recent increase in Doctor of Nursing Programs to facilitate the education on evidenced-based practice implementation. That’s a start.  Bringing evidence-based practice to fruition at the bedside requires time, talent, and team effort. The work is possible, plausible and paramount for optimal healthcare delivery in the 21st Century.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Norfidah Mohamad is a senior lecturer in Centre for Nursing Studies, UiTM Selangor, Malaysia. Her specialization is in Critical Care Nursing. Her research work and interest are in the area of Critical Care Nursing which focus in Intensive Care Nursing and Cardiology Nursing.

 

Abstract:

The National Health Morbidity Survey (NHMS) reported that the prevalence of Malaysian with diabetes mellitus (DM) is 11.6% and 14.6% for individuals age 18 and above and 30 and above respectively. Adherence to medications is an important aspect in patients’ management as many studies reported that non-adherence to medication could lead to hospitalization and higher mortality rates among this population. Thus, this study aimed to determine the prevalence of non-compliance of medication and to examine the association between medication adherences with social support among patients with Type 2 DM in Malaysia (n=173). A cross sectional study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire which consists of three parts; socio-demographic data, the Morisky Scale to measure medication adherence and the Medical Outcome Study Modified Social Support Survey (MOS MSSS). Results showed that 2.4% of the total number of patients demonstrating a low level of compliance towards the medication. The most common types of social support received by patients was affectionate support which has been proved throughout previous studies to have effect on DM patients’ quality of life. Surprisingly, the lowest type of social support reported by the patients was emotional support. There was a significant positive correlation between medication adherence and social support (rho=0.154, p=0.043). Finding of this study was in agreement with previous studies that social support was the main determinant of compliance to medication. Among all the sources of social support, doctors (physician) were selected by patient as the main source of support followed by spouse, children and nurses. Findings from the present research contribute to the growing evidence on the role of social support environment towards medication adherence among individuals with Type 2 DM. Thus, future research regarding the development of interventions on importance of social support and medication adherence is suggested among this population.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Azjargal Baatar has completed her MSN at the age of 38 years from Mongolian National Unversity of Medical Sciences and doctor studies from Monglian National University of Medical Sciences . She is the Head of Department Maternal & Child Nursing of School of Nursing, MNUMS. She has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals in Mongolia and has been serving as an editorial board member of CAJMS CAJMS.

Abstract:

Background: Faculty development is, therefore important to ensure that teachers and trainees are well prepared to assume their responsibilities as educators. The current and proposed effort to train more doctors, nurses, midwives and other health professionals puts an extra burben on institutions and their staff: more educators are needed and their functions must be made more attractive. Incentives such as access to faculty development are part of the response to bridge the gap between teaching and clinical work by allowing interaction between monitoring and coaching, relationships and networks, organizations systems and cultures, and tasks and activities[1]. Objective: This study sought to understand the attitudes held by faculty at one academic Mongolian National University of Medical Sciences (MNUMS) concerning IPE and teamwork. This MNUMS will to experience very modest progress towards IPE implementation. The study is based upon previous work by Curran et al. (2007) that asked faculty to rate their attitudes towards interprofessional health care teams, IPE and interprofessional learning in an academic setting. Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used to survey participants from a convenience sample of faculty at one academic MNUMS located within a large university in the Mongolia. The colleges represented were medicine, dentistry,  nursing, pharmacy, public health, biomedicine and traditional medicine. Results: The attitude score was determined by summing the responses to 14 statements. The mean score (±SD) for all respondents was 4.1 (±0.10). Highly scored benefits included more efficient care, better understanding of the work of other health professionals and fostering communication. The attitude score was determined by summing the responses to 15 statements. The mean score (±SD) for all respondents was 3.83 (±0.10). Highly scored benefits of IPE were “Patient would ultimately benefit it health care students worked together to solve patient problems” and “Learning between health care students before qualification would improve working relationships after qualifications”.  The attitude score was determined by summing the responses to 13 statements. The mean score score (±SD) for all respondents was 3.41 (±0.10). The most highly scored benefits of IPE in the academic setting “Interprofessional efforts require support from campus administration” and “Interprofessional efforts weaken course content”. A summary of the results is shown in Figure I. The mean score (±SD) for all respondents was 1.26 (±0.64). These barriers included lack of reward for faculty, problems with schedule/calendar, classroom size, lack of administration support, lack of received value, turf battles, students acceptance, lack of financial resources, faculty attitudes, rigid curricula. Conclusion: Therefore, we are need to recognize that the knowledge level in general professional competency is not a critical barrier to implementing IPE.

 

Myagmarchuluun S

MNUMS-School of Public Health, Mongolia

Title: Workload of nursing professionals and future perspectives
Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Background: In healthcare system nursing care and nursing professionals are the essential parts and implementing advanced, professional nursing care remains inseparably required for quality improvement in health.

Study aim: We aimed to study workload of nursing professionals and to define future tendencies

Materials and methods: We surveyed our study by cross-sectional design in hospital based setting. Subjects were randomly recruited from primary and advanced level healthcare facility nurses. Some nurses were recruited by stratified sampling method from advanced level hospitals and total of 179 nurses from 22 specialties working in 32 facilities. By organization based observational method we analyzed for each specialties (1) and workload of nursing professionals (2) with “Job evaluation” criteria, documentary, and observational methods.

Results: Everyday routine duties were 469.8 minutes in primary level nurses, which is 25.6 minutes longer than advanced level hospitals. Average of time spent for each procedure or action in primary and advanced level hospitals for nurses are 13.1 and 12.4 minutes respectively. Customer load for primary level nurses were higher than advanced level hospital nurses as of 23.0 and 21.5, respectively. However time spent for healthcare services were lower in primary setting (234.0) than in advanced level setting (276.0). In cases timekeeping analysis were unavailable, “Job evaluation” criteria were used for determining skills, knowledge, practice, educational background, responsibilities according to duty and job, personal effort, given freedom, and working conditions. Total scores were calculated and degree of workload was evaluated based on the score. Analysis revealed that the subjects were belonged to III-V degree workloads and of these primary care nurses classified in III-IV degree, and advanced care nurses into III-V degree of workload. Until 1990, number of nurses produced into healthcare human resources were constantly increased, however declined overtime following the open market system. In 2015, 37.5 nurses were recorded per 10000 populations, which is the highest since 1995, although 267 populations are given to a nurse. Currently, nine of the eleven universities that train nurses have bachelor program in nursing education. These findings suggest dominancy in bachelor degree nurses is beingcommon in nursing education comparing other nursing programs. The prediction tendency until 2020 is shown based on the last decade statistics signifying possibilities to reach 13061 by 2020 and 13626.8 by 2024.

Conclusion: Primary care nurses have longer working time of 469.8 minutes, which is 25.6 minutes longer than advanced level care nurses. Although hospital service level and specialty of nurses differ from each other, job evaluation signifying workload classified between III-V grades. Statistical analysis based on last decade statistics revealed that nurses number tend to reach 13061 by 2020 and subsequently 13626.8 by 2024, however physician to nurse ratio may reach only 1:1.16. Population ratio per nurses may decrease gradually by 2024 to 249.5 persons per nurse due to increase of nursing professionals and slowing of population growth.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Anxiety is one of the most common and important psychological reactions in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Thus, this study aims to effects peer education on cardiac Anxiety in patients with acute myocardial infarction. This is a randomized clinical trial (RCT) study. Samples included 60 patients with myocardial infarction, who were randomly divided into two groups of intervention (peer education) and control. Anxiety was measured in both groups before intervention. Then the control group get routine training and the intervention group, in addition to routine training, was trained by peers; the anxiety level before the intervention, and four weeks after the heart attack, was assessed in the two groups by completing the questionnaires. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS v.22 software, There was no significant difference in the mean of anxiety level in both groups before intervention (p=0/889). The results of this study showed that patients who have received peer education had less level of anxiety compared to patients who received routine education. According to the findings of this study, peer education for patients with myocardial infarction seems to be an effective way to reduce anxiety in these patients. Therefore, it is recommended to use this educational approach in heart wards to educate patients.

Speaker
Biography:

Francis Kyerepagr Kobekyaa is a Nurse Educator at the St. Joseph’s Midwifery Training College, Jirapa in the Upper West Region of Ghana. Francis started his nursing career as a Community Health Nurse after graduating from the Jirapa Community Health Nursing Training School in 2004. Thereafter, he worked at Ketuo Health Centre as the Community Nurse in-charge of the facility in the Puffien Sub-District. He also doubled up as the CHOs’ Supervisor responsible for two CHPS Zones in the SubDistrict. During his time, the Sub-District recorded an increased in skilled delivery with improved maternal and child health service performance indicators. In 2007, he gained admission to the Presbyterian University, an affiliate of the University of Ghana where he obtained Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Registered General Nursing Licensing Certificates. In 2014, he obtained a scholarship from the Netherlands Initiative for Higher Education to pursue an Honours Degree in Nursing Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban. He graduated in 2016 and continued with a Full Research Masters (Mphil) in Nursing Research at the same university with funding from the Vice Chancellor of the university. He is currently working on two articles for publication.

Abstract:

Background: The hindrances to collaborative clinical facilitation for effective practical learning of nursing students are worrying. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the perceived barriers to collaborative clinical facilitation among nurse educators, preceptors, clinical nurses/midwives and nursing and midwifery students at two selected nursing and midwifery colleges and a hospital in Northern Ghana.

Methods: This study adopted a constructivist paradigm using a qualitative exploratory-descriptive approach. Purposive and systematic sampling methods were used to select participants for the study. Data were gathered through focus groups discussions and individual in-depth interviews and transcribed verbatim. The data were analyzed using Framework Analysis Method.

Findings: The study findings showed a sharp increase in student population at the colleges causing overcrowding and congestion at the clinical learning environments. Preceptors and other clinical staff who are trained and mandated to facilitate clinical teaching were insufficient, and therefore not available at all health care facilities or wards every time for students’ guidance and support. Participants further reported role confusion among staff due to lack of working agreements between staff of colleges and health facilities over who had the prime responsibility for clinical teaching of nursing students. This resulted in an adversarial relationship among key players of the collaborative network. Lack of time, heavy workload and busy ward schedules equally impacted negatively on the practice of collaborative clinical facilitation.

Conclusions: Based on these findings, nursing and midwifery colleges, in collaboration with healthcare facilities, need to create clinical placement calendars to coordinate students’ clinical schedules in the wards in order to avert the challenge of overcrowding. This would provide students the opportunity to be effectively supervised and guided during clinical practice in the ward. Ethical Clearance Reference Number: HSS/1553/016M.